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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 5 months 1 week ago #31700

  • Kawboy
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Your endoscope revealed that the engine was rebuilt as the story was told and it is a shame that it sat for 20 years seaside causing a rusted tank.
your endoscope pictures are a good historical reference for the future.
The pictures of the cam chain tensioner and tensioner idler confirm the low mileage. All Good !!
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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 5 months 1 week ago #31709

  • dcarver220b
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Those piston crowns look beautiful...

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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 4 months 3 weeks ago #31745

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I return to the thread after a few weeks waiting for the distribution chain tensioner purchased on EBAY, it has finally arrived!
 

After assembling it and ensuring the chain tension manually, I continued turning the crankshaft and I noticed some slack in the chain connecting it to the secondary shaft. Using the endoscopic camera I recorded the movement of the chain.
My question is this:
Is this normal slack or is the chain stretched?
Does it have to be replaced or can it be adjusted somehow without removing the engine?
Thanks for the answers.

youtube.com/shorts/lJfdgwjJ8ww
youtube.com/shorts/rlkPUl2TglQ

I'm having trouble uploading the video.
It has been published in the "Short" configuration.

 
RUN LIKE THE WIND¡¡¡
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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 4 months 3 weeks ago #31746

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All the information you require is in another post  Manual Timing Chain Initial Tension Setting

Regarding adjusting and finding a loose spot in the chain.  -  you have to appreciate that when the timing chain rotates the camshafts, as the camshaft lobes rollover the shim buckets there's force required to push down the shim bucket and then as a lobe rolls over the center point, the valve spring pushes the camshaft forward so there's a lot of intermittent tugging on the chain. It's hard to adjust it right when you are rolling it over by hand. I suspect that the chain is fine and you just have to tighten up the tensioner a little more.
I prefer to adjust the manual tensioners while the engine is running. Back off the locking nut and pull back the o ring so it is not adding any force on the tensioning rod. then start the engine and turn in the adjuster by hand, using your fingers only, no tools feeling for when the vibrations of the tensioning rod smooth out, and then lock it down. All you are trying to do is take up the slack in the chain and apply a light load to the adjuster.
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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 4 months 3 weeks ago #31747

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All the information you require is in another post  Manual Timing Chain Initial Tension Setting

Regarding adjusting and finding a loose spot in the chain.  -  you have to appreciate that when the timing chain rotates the camshafts, as the camshaft lobes rollover the shim buckets there's force required to push down the shim bucket and then as a lobe rolls over the center point, the valve spring pushes the camshaft forward so there's a lot of intermittent tugging on the chain. It's hard to adjust it right when you are rolling it over by hand. I suspect that the chain is fine and you just have to tighten up the tensioner a little more.
I prefer to adjust the manual tensioners while the engine is running. Back off the locking nut and pull back the o ring so it is not adding any force on the tensioning rod. then start the engine and turn in the adjuster by hand, using your fingers only, no tools feeling for when the vibrations of the tensioning rod smooth out, and then lock it down. All you are trying to do is take up the slack in the chain and apply a light load to the adjuster.
Thanks for the quick reply.
My question is directed at the tension that the chain that transmits the movement of the crankshaft to the primary shaft must have. I have noticed some slack.
RUN LIKE THE WIND¡¡¡

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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 4 months 3 weeks ago #31748

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Ahhhhh. The challenges of writing in one language and using a translator software program to interpret. Now I understand what your concern was.

This is right from page 189 of the Service Manual



 

You can measure this without splitting the engine with a little bit of thinking. I suspect that if the engine is under 100,000 Km and has had regular oil changes, the chain is fine.
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