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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 6 months 4 days ago #31633

  • dcarver220b
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You will get through these moments and it will be worth it.

 

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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 6 months 4 days ago #31634

  • Kawboy
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The carburetors will need to be cleaned again. this is not uncommon with these carbs. I think what happens is that the initial cleaner loosens up the varnish and debris and not all of it gets removed from the passages. then further driving moves around the remaining loose particles and they clog up the tiny passages in the idle transition circuits. This probably wouldn't happen if a bike had sat for a year but those bikes that have sat for multiple years will have substantial build up. There have been a few members that had to clean their carbs 5 or 6 times before they finally got out the debris out and had the bikes running as they should.
The other issue that has caused a lot of trouble is the cleaner used. I'm not familiar with "dichlor" but the name suggests that it has chlorine in it which is an oxidizer. Aluminum doesn't like oxidizers and it will tarnish the aluminum if left too long in the cleaner. I can't remember who it was that used a similar cleaner and let the carbs soak overnight only to find the carbs almost black with oxides. There was some thought that it completely ruined the carbs.
Lacquer Thinner has been our cleaner of choice but we have come to learn that Lacquer Thinner around the world is not the same product. In Europe, Lacquer Thinner is also called cellulose thinner and it's not the same product.
there are a few very interesting Youtube posts suggesting that gasoline is the perfect cleaner to use with an ultrasonic cleaner. Using a glass jar, place the carb parts in the glass jar and fill it with gasoline. Cap the jar and then immerse it in an ultrasonic cleaner that filled with water. The ultrasonic sound waves will transfer their sound waves through the jar and continue through the gasoline imploding on the parts in the jar and clean them. I haven't tried this method so I'm not sure how effective this is.
I like the Lacquer Thinner and I really like using the ultrasonic cleaner, so I may try using the glass jar in the ultrasonic cleaner with Lacquer Thinner  in the jar as an experiment and see if that works any better

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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 6 months 4 days ago #31635

  • kawaBCN
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If I tell you the truth..
I can dismantle the carburetors as many times as necessary, but a professional mechanic, I know several, will change gaskets and adjust the carburetors.
He will also tell me if the coils need to be changed.
RUN LIKE THE WIND¡¡¡

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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 5 months 3 weeks ago #31658

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A week later I cleaned the carburetors again, number two did not close the float.
It started the first time but I did not go out to ride, it sounded fine for a few minutes until it coughed again with a new gasoline spill through the airbox drain.

My children have already named the motorcycle seeing how I am abducted by it...
I hope I don't end up like the protagonist of the movie.

RUN LIKE THE WIND¡¡¡
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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 5 months 3 weeks ago #31659

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There are 2 reasons for carburetor flooding on these carbs-
1. The Nitrophyl floats (the stock black plastic floats) will eventually get saturated with gasoline and they will sink. When they do sink or start to sink most people will adjust the tang on the float to shut off the fuel at the right height. It's critical that the tang that actuates the float needle be at a right angle to the float needle and NOT try to shut off the needle by hitting it on an angle. If the tang tries to close the needle on an angle, It is possible for the needle to bind in the needle seat and not fully close. If you have to bend the tang on an angle to get your float level, then your float is saturated and you need to replace the float.
2. The other problem that not many people know about is that there is an o-ring around the needle seat that seals the needle seat in the carburetor body. The original o-ring was Buna-N Nitrile and any form of carb cleaner will ruin that o-ring and cause it to leak. What happens is the fuel bypasses the needle seat and leaks around the needle seat. If you replace that o-ring replace it with a Viton o-ring. Viton is a better choice because it is less reactive to cleaning solutions and Ethanol.

 
This is a float with a tang correctly shaped so that it closes the needle perpendicular to the needle

 
If your float tang has to be bent like the red line, then your float is saturated and needs to be replaced. if the tang is in this position, as it tries to close the needle, it pushes the needle on an angle and the needle will stick in the needle seat and not close properly.
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THE MOMENT OF TRUE. 5 months 3 weeks ago #31660

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This is the needle seat o ring that most people miss when rebuilding the BSW32 carbs. It seals the needle seat in the carburetor body. If it leaks, fuel will bypass around the seal and carburetor flooding will occur.

this o ring is 7.5mm outside diameter and 1.5mm thick. My advice is to replace it with a Viton75  o ring of that dimension. Ethanol will not affect Viton75. The original o ring was Buna-N Nitrile and back in the 1980's, Ethanol was not a component of gasoline.

As an example of updates to fuel systems-
Back in the early 1980's gasoline was just gasoline and fuel components that were elastomers were typically made of Nitrile. Along came fuel injection and the early mechanical fuel injections systems ran with fuel pressures aroung 15 PSI. Then along came electronic fuel injection and most  ran with fuel pressures around 43 psi. Then there was the introduction of Ethanol in fuel as an octane booster. Ethanol will react with Buna-N Nitrile and typically will shrink and weaken the Buna-N.
Porsche came out with a service bulletin requiring all Buna-N Nitrile fuel lines be upgraded to fuel injection certified fuel line material which was a Viton material. When the bulletin came out in the early 1990's , most Porsche owners were not going back to Porsche for service and were not aware of the bulletin. Many engine fires of Porsches from the 1980's and earlier were reported because the Nitrile fuel lines were disintegrating and leaking fuel into the engine compartment and fires occurred.
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