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Shindengen FH020AA versus the newer SH847 1 month 3 hours ago #28774

  • Stiggy
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I haven't seen a circuit diagram for a mosfet regulator, but it would be much simpler to rectify the 3 phase alternator output into dc first. Then pulse width modulate ( at highish frequency)a DC side mosfet to provide the exact amount of power to run the loads and regulate the system voltage at the desired value.
1985 ZG1300 dfi
1977 Z1000 a1 recent purchase, previously owned by myself 1979 ~2000

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Shindengen FH020AA versus the newer SH847 1 month 1 hour ago #28775

  • Kawboy
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Stiggy wrote: I haven't seen a circuit diagram for a mosfet regulator, but it would be much simpler to rectify the 3 phase alternator output into dc first. Then pulse width modulate ( at highish frequency)a DC side mosfet to provide the exact amount of power to run the loads and regulate the system voltage at the desired value.


Maybe this will help for those who understand electrical schematics. It's a little above my paygrade. I thought the video who be sufficient to demonstrate that the shunt regulator puts out full current regardless of the load.
Shindengen regulator schematics for shunt, series and mosfet
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Shindengen FH020AA versus the newer SH847 1 month 49 minutes ago #28776

  • Phil
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Stiggy wrote: I haven't seen a circuit diagram for a mosfet regulator, but it would be much simpler to rectify the 3 phase alternator output into dc first. Then pulse width modulate ( at highish frequency)a DC side mosfet to provide the exact amount of power to run the loads and regulate the system voltage at the desired value.


Instead of dumping the current to ground? I've always thought it was a crude, wasteful system but I wonder if they do it so that the generator is always under a constant load & doesn't receive sudden loadings with the demand being switched on & off, therefore shortening it's life span?
Incidentally I fitted a Shindengen FH020 RR about 12 years ago; along with cutting out the connector plug & soldering the cables for the generator I've had no more charging problems.
Only dead fish go with the flow

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