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TOPIC: 1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild

1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild 7 months 1 week ago #24091

  • Bucko
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Stan: That looks great! The thing that's always bothered me about the manual tensioner option, or even swapping in the tensioner from a Zxxx..(can't remember) is that there's no way to know, at least for the average Joe, when the tension is correctly set. Using the original tensioner presumably sets the tension properly with the bolt protecting the tensioner plunger from 'slipping' backwards. Best of both worlds IMHO.
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1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild 7 months 1 week ago #24097

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The thing that's always bothered me about the manual tensioner option, or even swapping in the tensioner from a Zxxx..(can't remember) is that there's no way to know, at least for the average Joe, when the tension is correctly set



Exactly. I played with mine and turning it by hand couldn't feel anything - it's is just too stiff. Then adjusted it looking at the chain and feeling the tension by hand. After running the engine played with it a little more back and forth, and left it where I thought it sounds the smoothest. All looked fine when I removed the cover after a few hundred miles to check the valves. Now it's time to do the same. I'm going to do the same mod on my spare tensioner for the spare engine I am building. I think having the correct as per design pressure there is the best - no guessing. And with this mod, it preserves the automatic adjustment and is also safe.
1982 Kawasaki KZ1300 A4
1981 Kawasaki KZ1300 A3
assembling engine, chassis & electrical from 79 - 89 parts

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1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild 7 months 1 week ago #24099

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I did the same Mod. with my OEM tensioner BUT:
There have been concerns regarding this mod - specifically - regarding the lack of material in the end, itself. You only get, at best, a couple of threads !
I solved that concern by supplementing with an internal nut.
www.kz1300.com/index.php/forum/engines/3...pgrade?start=6#23340
1980 KZ 1300 sr# KZT30A-009997
Always High - Know Fear !

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Last edit: by scotch.

1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild 7 months 1 week ago #24101

  • StanG
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I remembered that scotch and kept that in the back of my mind. It's an easy thing to still add. The one thing that was concerning me was how to keep the nut from spinning? A tight fit, that might prevent it from spinning.. A bit of red permanent Locktite?

How did you prevent the nut from spinning inside? Unless it's pressed very tight it might just spin along the added bold, back and forth with the vibrations, as it would be a loose nut in there (no pun intended), basically a threaded cylinder free to spin with the oil everywhere.

I also have those aluminum e-z welding rods, which are basically brazing rods. The results seem to be very strong, and people very happy. I've been considering building up that back of the tensioner.

I'll see what I will do, but with a self locking nut I think it will hold up. Definitely not to apply 29 lbs-ft! After all, thin aluminum brackets are often threaded and they work well, with just 3 threads cut. This bolt needs just enough tension to keep it in place, no extra mechanical forces affecting it. Except in case of the tensioner failure and backing off - that added internal nut would prevent it popping out if threads get stripped. But would there be that much force from the spring? I don't think so.. And if the nut happens to be right at the end of the bolt, the bolt theoretically could travel far enough to let the chain jump. That would need to be measured to confirm or dismiss.

Well, I have one more tensioner to play around. I will try the e-z aluminum weld and see if this can be done.
1982 Kawasaki KZ1300 A4
1981 Kawasaki KZ1300 A3
assembling engine, chassis & electrical from 79 - 89 parts

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1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild 7 months 1 week ago #24104

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It's been a while since I did this but it seems to me that I just rounded the nut to where it pressed in (tolerance fit). Might have used Loctite - I know I didn't use anything like epoxy.
Kawboy is the expert in "melt/fusing" materials so he may have an opinion but Personally: I'd go the internal "nut" option again, before I'd even consider trying to "weld" addition material on the end of the CCT. Too much heat and the end could collapse - not enough and all you'll have is a build-up that's little more then "stuck" to the end of the CCT - as opposed to properly fused.
1980 KZ 1300 sr# KZT30A-009997
Always High - Know Fear !

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1982 KZ1300 rescue and rebuild 7 months 1 week ago #24105

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I've been thinking about this:

"Weld" Aluminum Without a Welder

I've seen other videos, and guys braze anything from engine covers to internal parts of engine. I've also seen many tests online - the 'weld' seems to be actually very strong, and they file it, grind, drill. As it doesn't stick to steel, I also saw someone screw in a bolt and build up aluminum around it, with good results. That's what I was thinking about - this doesn't melt the tensioner, or anything else you work on, including thin aluminum cans, except the rod.

I wonder what others would suggest about keeping the internal nut in place.
1982 Kawasaki KZ1300 A4
1981 Kawasaki KZ1300 A3
assembling engine, chassis & electrical from 79 - 89 parts

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